Online article by Katherine Preston

Communication and emotion are caught up in such a delicate dance, and some of it isn’t pretty.

The ability to be heard by others, to listen to what the world has to offer each day, to share readily and easily one’s memories, experiences, opinions and dreams—all contribute to a sense of social completeness and belonging, to feelings of contentment.

The reverse is also true. Emotional responses to communication disorders—how we react to the continual threat of being isolated from friends, family, colleagues and peers—can run a complex gamut, sometimes over the course of a single day. Sometimes we accept, other times we might get frustrated, angry or really depressed.

Originating in a well-received ASHA convention session, Katherine Preston’s powerful piece profiles two people who stutter who confronted the darkness at the extreme end of this cascading emotional spectrum. With the help of speech-language pathologists, Scott Palasik and Tim returned to the light.

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The International Stuttering Association
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